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Ryan Day, another example of why you should always leave on good terms

During the busiest time of the year in terms of coaching turnover, we're occasionally reminded of a situation where one coach leaves for another school and doesn't leave on the best terms, whether that's with the players he leaves behind or the fan base in general. Other times, coaches handle the situation perfectly, like when Ryan Day left Boston College to become the co-offensive coordinator at Temple back in February.

However, after two seasons in Philadelphia, Steve Addazio made the decision to take the Boston College job. Considering Day's recent ties with the BC program, bringing him back for a homecoming of sorts was a no brainer for Addazio. 

Day's familiarity with what Boston College can offer recruits and their families, as well as his familiarity with the administration and on the field personnel that they inherit will prove to be a huge asset for Addazio and the rest of his staff.

Upon his arrival back in Boston, Day explained to a few players that leadership and getting the team to live up to a certain standard that is going to be expected of everyone is going to play a huge role in their sucess as a team, and as an offense. He also explained his plan to build relationships to Boston.com so that the staff is able to "coach players hard". 

“We’re going to coach these guys as hard as we possibly can, with everything that we have. In order to do that, that relationship’s got to be built. They’ve got to have trust in you that you love them, that you care about them, that you have their best interests at heart." 

“If that’s not there, then it’s hard to coach real hard. It’s hard to be in their face, it’s hard to create conflict, because there’s no trust between the player and the coach. 

Those relationships, whether its coach to coach, or coach to player are what really matter, and Day having the opportunity to return to the program on a good note with the players that he helped recruit and a program that he helped build is a great illustration of that idea. If he had left on bad terms, rebuilding those relationships would prove to be much more difficult. 

Coaching is a crazy profession, and you never really know where you might end up. For that reason, it's always important to ensure that, if you decide to leave for another opportunity, you leave the place on good terms with the players that you recruited or formed relationships with, and the administration who gave you the opportunity. 

Author: Doug Samuels
Doug Samuels has been with FootballScoop since 2011. Samuels joined the FootballScoop staff after serving as a college scout as well as an assistant coach at the college level, where he was fortunate enough to have coached every offensive position by age 24. Samuels is a lifelong Michigan State fan, no huddle enthusiast, and currently coaches high school football in West Michigan.