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  • FootballScoop visits with Warren McCarty (MPIF)

    WarrenMcCartyMPIF

    This weekend Scott was joined by coaches’ agent Warren McCarty on FootballScoop radio. Warren represents a number of clients at the division II, FCS and FBS levels.

    This is a great listen for young coaches.

    Warren tells it like it is regarding what’s available to be negotiated for, how important your “network” is, search firms, preparing for interviews and more.

  • The problem with hiring coaches in the L.A. public school system

    ESPN LA

    ESPN LA

    According to the Los Angeles Times, 58 percent of coaches at the 83 Los Angeles Unified School District high schools are “walk-ons,” the term used to describe part-time, non-certified employees. Those among that 58 percent that coach football earn a $2,811 stipend annually.

    A high school football coach works, conservatively, six days a week at 26 weeks a year. That’s roughly $100 a week, $16 and change a day. Considering gas prices and other realities life in Los Angeles presents, the LAUSD provides gas money for three out of every five coaches and not much else.

    On one hand, coaching for one rung above free weeds out anyone who doesn’t want to be there. On the other, the Los Angeles public school system places a minimal investment into the group of people asked to develop its young men.

    And aspiring young coaches need not apply. Writes Eric Sondheimer of the L.A. Times: “One of the big hurdles is that hiring a new physical education teacher-coach is very difficult because jobs are scarce and there’s a long waiting list of displaced P.E. teachers in the district that have priority over any new hires. Promising young coaches have to wait at the back of the line.”

    It creates a system where LAUSD’s brightest young coaches are leaving the district or bypassing it altogether, leaving the students to feel the consequences. “Walk-ons don’t have the same access to students during the school day as teachers,” Sondheimer writes. “They can’t monitor academics or discipline issues as closely as teachers. If someone wants to make additional money while teaching, anything but coaching is more lucrative, from tutoring to coaching travel teams.”

    While there are undoubtedly talented, dedicated coaches within the L.A. public schools, coaching is a lot like anything else in life: you get out what you put in. And when LAUSD puts next to no incentive for new coaches to join its ranks, what result is it expecting to yield?

    Read more here.

  • The value of multi-sport athletes: HS coaches share this with your players

    DeionMultiSport

    AthlonSports

    In a day and age where more and more high school athletes seem to be focused on specializing in one sport, and training year round in that specific sport, some interesting numbers have surfaced recently on the value of participating in more than one sport in high school.

    When it comes to recruiting and drafting guys, college and NFL coaches place a high value on the multi-sport athletes, and there’s no shortage of recent statistics to prove it.

    Take this tweet that I saw over the weekend for example:

    Recruiting multi-sport athletes is something that college coaches talk about all the time, and a number of additional tweets over the past few months have really helped to illustrate just how valued they are by some of the top coaches and programs in the country.

    Guys like Nick Saban, Urban Meyer, and Brian Kelly are just a small handful of the coaches that targer two, and three sport athletes.

    So the next time one of your players with the dreams of playing at the college level tells you that they won’t be playing a sport in the spring or winter so they can focus on football, show them this article.

  • FootballScoop visits with Walker Jones (CAA)

    WalkerJones

    This weekend Scott visited with Walker Jones who joined Jimmy Sexton and Trace Armstrong at CAA a little over a year ago.

    In a wide ranging interview, Jones provides excellent feedback for coaches at all levels.

    For example, on setting expectations, Jones offered, “We don’t go out and get people jobs, that’s not our job. Our job is to educate our clients, to prepare our clients, to market our clients, to get them in front of the right people…but at the end of the day it’s on the coach to get that job…”

    Scott asks what are the things that coaches want them to advocate for. “Flexibility with security.”

    This is loaded with great content about the role agents serve and what coaches should expect.

  • The Head Ball Coach is now on Twitter

    NCAA Football: Georgia at South Carolina

    We have been given a gift today, friends.

    Steve Spurrier is now on Twitter.

    Spurrier’s first tweet, fittingly for someone who is 69 years old, was a quickly-deleted misfire after he mistakenly tagged the University of Southern California.

    Here’s hoping Spurrier’s thumbs are as sharp as his tongue.