Advertisement

Since 1999 all sources remain confidential. Mail@FootballScoop.com or 225.229.3429
  • Photo: The most, uh, creative helmet design in college football

    Division II Virginia State unveiled new helmets on Thursday. Normally we wouldn’t devote a post to a Division II helmet reveal, but these are not normal helmets.

    First, here is how the Trojans dressed in 2014:

    Virginia State

    And, now, here is how they will dress in 2015:

    Screen Shot 2015-07-03 at 9.18.41 AM

    We’ve seen lots of chrome helmets before. And thanks to the Jacksonville Jaguars and mid-aughts San Diego State we’ve seen two-toned helmets before. But I’m not sure we’ve ever seen both on the same helmet.

  • Diddy won’t be charged for kettlebell incident

    DiddyUCLA

    The story of the month offseason year millennium broke last week as Diddy was arrested for allegedly attacking UCLA strength coach Sal Alosi with a kettlebell after Alosi kicked the rap mogul’s son, Justin Combs, out of a workout for poor effort.

    The Diddy camp responded by claiming self-defense. Of course they did.

    “The various accounts of the event and charges that are being reported are wholly inaccurate,” Combs Enterprises rep Nathalie Moar said. “What we can say now is that any actions taken by Mr. Combs were solely defensive in nature to protect himself and his son.”

    And now, realizing they have absolutely nothing to gain from this, the UCLA staff decided not to pursue the allegation further, leading to the Los Angeles District Attorney’s office declining to press charges, according to Variety. “We are thankful that the District Attorney rejected Felony charges in this matter,” Diddy’s lawyer Mark Geragos said in a statement. “This case never should have been part of the criminal justice system to begin with.”

    Here’s hoping the two sides can make up by letting Diddy sign Jim Mora to a record deal.

  • Barry Alvarez on the difficulty of hiring a head coach without head coaching experience

    Madison.com

    Madison.com

    It’s a dilemma that all of us run into at some point in life, whether it be as a 16-year-old first-time job seeker or a 40-year-old with nearly 20 years experience in the work force. At some point, all of us apply for jobs we have no experience doing that require “3-to-5 years experience” doing that same job.

    “But how does anyone gain experience in a job unless someone hires them to do that job?” you ask as you slam your head against your desk.

    Here’s an answer from the other side of the equation. With longtime head coach Bo Ryan retiring after this season, Wisconsin athletics director Barry Alvarez is faced with a protracted coaching search in the Badgers’ most successful sport. At the top of the list is Greg Gard, a top Wisconsin assistant with no head coaching experience. Alvarez said Gard will be considered for the job, but he feels he owes it to the university to conduct a full search.

    “It is a challenge, because every person that moves from that position – and I did it – you’re in that job for two weeks and the first thing you hear is, ’You didn’t tell me about all this stuff. You never prepared me for any of this,’” told the Associated Press.

    “Everybody thinks they can make the move, but you’ve never been in a position where the buck stops here and that final decision is yours and you’re responsible for everybody and everything that’s done with the program. You’re always going to have some things come up — there are always going to be curveballs and some things you have to deal with that you haven’t been prepared for.”

    For what it’s worth, Alvarez wouldn’t be where he is today if not for Wisconsin hiring a head coach with no head coaching experience, as it did with him in 1990 to spectacular, program-changing results. And on top of that, Alvarez’s very first hire was to promote a longtime lieutenant to his first head coaching position. Following his retirement from coaching in 2005, Alvarez, already in place as Wisconsin’s AD, chose Badgers defensive coordinator Bret Bielema as his replacement. In his first head coaching position, Bielema went 68-24 with three Big Ten championships and six top-25 finishes in his seven seasons on the job.

  • Video of the Day: Youngstown State summer conditioning

    Video of the Day

    Friday July 3, 2015

    Youngstown State summer conditioning

  • Rule differences between the CFL and NFL

    CFL

    Canada and the United States that share a lot in common but still differ in quirky but meaningful ways. This, too, goes for their two respective brands of football.

    Below is a list of 16 differences from the NFL to the CFL. Some of them you’re probably already aware of, some of them you aren’t, and some of them are fake. No peeking at the fake rules until you get to the bottom, eh?

    1. Twelve men on a team. The additional man is a back who is an eligible receiver

    2. The defense must line up one yard off the line of scrimmage

    3. Each team gets one re-do play per game

    4. There are three downs instead of four to achieve 10 yards

    5. Field is 65 yards wide compared to 53 1/3

    6. Field is 110 yards long

    7. End Zones are 20 yards deep

    8. Holding the opponent scoreless on three consecutive possessions grants a team one extra timeout per half

    9. Twenty second play clock after referee signal

    10. Line of scrimmage for a convert is the 25 yard line

    11. A gain of 40 yards or more allows a team a first-and-5 on its next snap instead of a first-and-10

    12. A fumbled ball may be kicked in any direction by either team

    13.If a kicked ball goes out of bounds it is awarded to the team that did not kick it

    14. A fumbled ball, which goes out of bounds, is awarded to the team who last touched it in bounds

    15.It’s not grounding if the ball crosses the line of scrimmage  even if there is not a wide receiver there

    16. All eligible receivers can be in motion prior to the snap. Receivers on the line of scrimmage can move up and down the line of scrimmage

    Allow Trey Wingo to explain:

    And, in case you haven’t figured it out yet, rules three, eight and 11 are fake. Very, very fake.