MTSU offensive coordinator Tony Franklin’s daughter got married this Spring, so in his absence, MTSU head coach Rick Stockstill decided to have his starting quarterback (and son) Brent call the offense during the Blue Raiders’ practice.

For a little background, Brent broke his collarbone late in the season and then had surgery on his other should earlier this Spring so he’s been on the sideline soaking things in as much as possible, and as is the case with most coach’s sons, he’s always been a student of the game and is the leader of this team.

As you will see in the video, this was a great learning experience for Brent and generated an interesting idea in my head: for teams with returning starters, having your quarterback take the reigns of the offense for a day, or a specific practice period, is a can be a great way to further educate your signal callers.

Having your quarterback trade his helmet for a headset temporarily can impact a number of things. First of all, it forces him to think more situationally, and be very conscious of the different personnel being used and alignments of his teammates. From the perspective of his teammates, the opportunity to call the shots gives him an opportunity to gain their respect in a whole new light. Both those things can prove to be very beneficial down the road on game day.

A few notes about Brent’s career thus far…despite missing the final three games of his sophomore season (2016), Brent already holds the school record for career touchdown passes & 300 yard passing games. Prior to his sophomore season he was voted a permanent team captain. He earned Ironman status from the strength & conditioning staff and was named to the C-USA All-Academic Football Team (2016).

As you can see, Brent Stockstill is going to be one heck of a coach down the road; but for now, lets enjoy watching him on the field on Saturdays. Note in the video from about 3:30 – 4:00 how he compares himself to Brett Favre. #Toughness and #Gritty. Love that from a coach’s son.

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Our President since 2008, Scott oversees daily operations. An outstanding high school athlete (he wrote that), he chose to go pro in something other than playing football (i.e. he couldn't break a 5.0 40 yard dash). Prior to purchasing FootballScoop, Scott served as a vice president of The Shaw Group, a Fortune 500 company, for eight years.