There’s an ongoing war of worlds between the SEC and ACC and the rest of college football on the issue of satellite camps. Perhaps you’ve heard something something about this. The ACC and SEC want the NCAA to step in and close the rule allowing Big 12, Big Ten and Pac-12 staffs to guest coach at camps hosted by other programs. The other leagues, naturally, see nothing wrong with the rule and argue the other leagues’ need for protection against themselves isn’t their problem and see satellite camps as an opportunity to get in front of players without burdening their families with the expenses of plane tickets and hotel stays. Round and round we go.

At his league’s spring meetings yesterday, Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott offered something of a compromise. That’s how all wars end, don’t they? It’s always a compromise. Scott suggested opening regional combines as meet-in-the-middle solution between the two sides.

In speaking to a number of people within the conference, FootballScoop found unanimous support for Scott’s idea within the Pac-12. “Kids won’t have to pick where to go or how to spend their money, and if they want to get recruited they know they would have to attend them,” one source said.

As fate would have it, the regional combines Scott spoke about already exist and, until recently, coaches were already permitted to attend them. Nike and Rivals/UnderArmour combines take place on a grand scale at this moment.

Look at the number of Nike combines and regionals taking place this spring:

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Here’s Rivals/UnderArmour:

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A number of people we spoke with supported opening such combines back up to coaches, which were banned due to the same reasons rules always get written in college sports: fear and jealousy. Some coaches were afraid attending summer combines would suck away their assistants’ summers. Some feared football recruiting too similarly mirrored basketball recruiting. Others argued for a ban to prevent rival schools from hosting such camps on or near their campuses.

So why not open them up again? If combines took place during the spring recruiting period, the recruiting calendar wouldn’t need changing. It would still be a low-cost option for players to get in front of coaching staffs, while giving programs equal opportunities to scout players?

For those seeing downside where we don’t, what are we missing?

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National columnist - Zach joined the staff in 2012...and has been attempting to improve Doug and Scott's writing ability ever since (to little avail). Outside of football season, you can find him watching the San Antonio Spurs reading Game of Thrones fan theories.