The XFL is no longer competing with the AAF, because the AAF is dead.

But, still, it’ll be hard to avoid comparing the two spring start-up leagues, given that they both planned on competing with each other. And it’s with that in mind that we say this: the XFL’s TV deal is better than the AAF.

The AAF played the bulk of its games on the bottom row of the cereal shelf — CBS Sports Network, NFL Network and streaming through Bleacher Report. The XFL will be right at eye level.

The XFL announced on Monday a TV agreement with ABC/ESPN and FOX, with 24 of the 43 games in its inaugural season on broadcast television, while the other 19 will be on ESPN, Fox Sports 1 or Fox Sports 2.

The season will begin the Saturday after the Super Bowl, just as the AAF did, and conclude the last Sunday of April, just as the AAF would have.

The XFL will not make money on the broadcast rights; the networks will carry the games for free and sell ads around them, while also carrying the costs of putting the games on the air.

Though the league will not draw revenue from its TV rights, it will use its best-in-class TV arrangement to draw revenue in other areas.

“We wanted maximum reach, and these deals provide us with that,” XFL President & COO Jeffrey Pollack said.

As always, stay tuned to The Scoop for the latest.

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National columnist - Zach joined the staff in 2012...and has been attempting to improve Doug and Scott's writing ability ever since (to little avail). Outside of football season, you can find him watching the San Antonio Spurs reading Game of Thrones fan theories.