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Further proof that success on the field and classroom go hand in hand

The NCAA graduation rates released Thursday paint a rosy picture across the football landscape in Division I. Graduation rates for student-athletes entering college in 2006, the most recent data available, was up from 57 percent to 58 percent over a year ago in FBS, and up from 55 percent to 58 percent in FCS.

Taking a larger picture, graduation rates have risen from 47 percent to 59 percent from 1984 to 2006 for Division I football players. The NCAA reports that white players are up from 47 percent to 69 percent, and African-American football players have grown from 35 percent in 1984 to 53 percent in 2006.

In FBS, the top 10 graduation rates greatly performed the bottom 10 graduation rates on the field as well as in the classroom.

Top 10 (2012 record in parenthesis)
1. Northwestern - 98 percent (10-3)
2. Rice - 95 (7-6)
3. Boston College - 94 (2-10)
3. Notre Dame - 94 (12-1)
5. Air Force - 93 (6-7)
5. Stanford - 93 (12-2)
7. Duke - 92 (6-7)
8. Boise State - 91 (11-2)
9. Army - 89 (2-10)
10. Miami - 86 (7-5)
10. Wake Forest - 86 (5-7)

Bottom 10 (2012 record in parenthesis)
1. California - 44 (3-9)
2. Florida International - 47 (3-9)
3. Troy - 48 (5-7)
4. Oklahoma - 51 (10-3)
4. San Jose State - 51 (11-2)
6. Central Michigan - 53 (7-6)
6. USC - 53 (7-6)
8. Arkansas - 54 (4-8)
8. Florida Atlantic - 54 (3-9)
10. Ole Miss - 55 (7-6)

The above 11 schools went a combined 80-60 last season; the lower 10 were 60-65. Of the 10 schools at the bottom of the graduation ratings, five have willingly changed head coaches since 2006. 

Overall, the only Division I school to post a perfect 100 was Campbell University of the Pioneer Football League. Schools from the Pioneer Football League, Ivy League and Patriot League claimed the top five spots and nine of the top 10 for the entirety of Division I. Schools from the SWAC or MEAC occupied the bottom five spots and 10 of the bottom 15. 

See the full list here.