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"A lot of ADs are more interested in hiring guys who're going to win the podium than they are in hiring football coaches"

Gary Patterson's success leading the TCU program since the early 2000's leading the TCU program has been nothing short of remarkable. He's compiled a record of 157-55, won conference titles in the Big 12 (1), Mountain West (4) and Conference USA (1), and already has had a statue dedicated in his honor outside of the stadium.

ESPN published an article today detailing his success, a bit of his journey, and how he's dealt with interest from other programs. Like back in 2008 and 2009 when he interviewed with Nebraska and Tennessee before the programs ultimately decided to hire Bo Pelini and Lane Kiffin, respectively.

In 2008, Patterson was coming off a 11-2 season, a win in the Poinsettia Bowl, and a #7 ranking in the AP and Coaches Polls, and in 2009 he led his Mountain West Champs to an undefeated regular season and berth in the Fiesta Bowl - a huge deal for a non-BCS school. That 2009 season, following a loss in their bowl game to Boise State, they finished ranked #6 nationally.

Despite that success, Patterson said he got the feeling both Tennessee and Nebraska didn't think he was ready for the big stage.

Via ESPN:

"Tennessee didn't think I could handle the big stage," Patterson said. "My wife and I went to dinner with them, and I could tell they had already decided on Kiffin. It was the same with Nebraska. I interviewed and could tell they had already decided on Pelini. I think a lot of these ADs now are more interesting in hiring guys who're going to win the podium than they are in hiring football coaches, and there's a lot more to it than that if you're going to win championships."

Patterson smiled when asked whether he would have taken either the Tennessee or Nebraska job had he been offered.

"It's sort of like the old Garth Brooks song. Sometimes the best prayers are unanswered prayers," Patterson said.

In the article, Patterson shares some more great advice on what a mentor told him to look for in a head coaching job, and why "anybody can call plays" but it takes a special individual to run an entire program.

Head here to read the full piece.