Source tells FootballScoop there is concern within the building about the direction of the UCLA program and who will be leading it into the future.

Following multiple meetings this week between Chip Kelly and UCLA administrators, source tells FootballScoop the potential exists for a more significant change than anyone anticipated.

Jim Mora led the Bruins from 2012-17. In Mora’s first four seasons his teams averaged 9+ wins per year. 2016 + ’17 saw the wheels come off, dropping to four wins in 2016 and six in ’17.

Chip Kelly was hired (after a dogfight with Florida for his services) to right the ship but, man, it hasn’t gone smoothly to date.

The 2018 season was a write-off, other than a big end of season win over USC, with three wins total. The 2019 campaign was supposed to be the year we began to see this program find their footing; but after an 0-3 start, there were a lot of articles written about Chip’s buyout (which is a lot).

Following a stunning comeback victory over Washington State, the program showed at least a bit of life. They lost at Arizona and vs. Oregon State, but followed those up with wins at Stanford, vs. Arizona State and vs. Colorado. There was excitement coming off that 3-game win streak heading into their game at Utah, but 49-3 crushed the Bruins’ excitement. Last week’s loss at USC (52-35) leaves the Bruins 4-7 with the season finale tomorrow night against Cal.

Contractually speaking, UCLA would be on the hook for a $9 million buyout should they fire Chip. Conversely, if Chip were to “leave” he would owe them $9 million. Could the parties decide change is needed and agree upon a smaller number?

As always, for all the latest coaching job information stay tuned to The Scoop.


Update> Bruce Feldman tweets that Chip Kelly isn’t going to buy himself out of this contract for $9 million. That was never a possibility. If UCLA wants to make a change there will be dollars involved.

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