On Wednesday we took a look at the revenues FBS schools reported to the U.S. Department of Education for the 2018-19 academic year, and now it’s the FCS’s turn.

The FBS version sparked some questions, and this one will as well. There’s no standard reporting practice mandated by the Department of Education, so if one school counts donations that go toward football tickets as football-specific revenue and another puts that in the general athletic fund, there’s no way to account for that. All we know is the numbers the DoE spits out.

So, no, I can’t explain how North Dakota State comes in at No. 15 here.

1. James Madison — $10.7 million
2. Montana State — $8.7 million
3. Montana — $8.6 million
4. Delaware — $8.3 million
5. Fordham — $7.6 million
6. Furman — $7.4 million
7. William & Mary — $7.1 million
8. Richmond — $7 million
9. Lafayette — $6.8 million
10. Villanova — $6.76 million
11. Colgate — $6.74 million
12. Eastern Washington — $6.73 million
13. Alabama A&M — $6.5 million
14. Bucknell — $6.2 million
15. North Dakota State — $6.048 million
16. Elon — $6.043 million
17. Lehigh — $5.97 million
18. Samford — $5.94 million
19. UC Davis — $5.75 million
20. The Citadel — $5.73 million
21. North Carolina A&T — $5.61 million
22. Holy Cross — $5.6 million
23. Wofford — $5.53 million
24. Sacramento State — $5.52 million
25. Idaho — $5.52 million

Nos. 24 and 25 is not a typo. Sacramento State and Idaho actually reported a single, solitary dollar’s difference in revenue. Sacramento State says its football program brought in $5,515,779, while Idaho reported $5,515,778.

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National columnist - Zach joined the staff in 2012...and has been attempting to improve Doug and Scott's writing ability ever since (to little avail). Outside of football season, you can find him watching the San Antonio Spurs reading Game of Thrones fan theories.