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2010 Coaches Quick Hits

Monday February 22, 2010

Very interesting quote an NFL executive told Si.com writer Peter King: "You know why it's (the Draft board) 90 percent set now?" the source told King. "Because guys go to the Scouting Combine and they change their grade on a player based on things that have nothing to do with playing football. I'm convinced if you took the stopwatches away from a lot of these guys, most of 'em would not be able to tell you whether they liked a player or not.

"These guys go out and watch players all fall, then we all watch the tape of all these guys, and we see what kind of football players they are. That's scouting. Who plays good football in pads? That's scouting. Now we need the combine for the medical evaluations and the personal baggage stuff. But don't come in after the combine and tell me you want to change some guy and move him way up because he ran faster than you thought he would. That's where you get in trouble, and that's why our draft board is pretty well set.''

Quoting Montana head coach Robin Pflugrad: "After hiring our coaches, that was the first order of business," Pflugrad says as he sits at his cluttered desk, calendars in view and a watch on his wrist. "Our recruiting board was bare; for whatever reasons, it was totally bare."

"If you've ever seen the movie ‘Ocean's 11,' that's how we worked. We had a plan. We were going to attack, and that's exactly how Brad Pitt and his boys went after the casino and got the thing done. There were so many moving parts in that movie that it reminded me of this recruiting process," Pflugrad says.

Quoting Oregon State head coach Mike Riley: "Our goal now until we go out again in May is for each coach to get a top 30 in his area," Riley said. "We gather names from different sources - high school coaches or recruiting services that list prospects. We've invested in a recruiting service that includes video. We just want names to get started."

"That's the time we are gone the most, is after season," Riley said. "A lot of people have no idea what that's like at all. They think when the season is over, so what do we do? It's really the hardest time of the year. There's no rhythm or routine. It's just go, go, go. It's quite a month."

Quoting Rich Rod: "Every day, not just myself, but our players and my coaches , we don't just coach or play Michigan football, we live it. It's imbedded in the fiber of my soul. It is just like it was with Lloyd and Bo, Mo and Jerry (Hanlon) and all the past players and all the past greats that had to do with the University of Michigan football program. I appreciate our history. I embrace it. Why wouldn't you?"

"Sometimes when you go through a little adversity, some folks will try to fracture the program or fracture our fan base, but that's not going to happen. That's not going to happen because of you. That's not going to happen because of past coaches. Not going to happen because people like Rick Leach won't let it happen."

"I don't know if I can express in words how thankful I am to have this opportunity to coach here... I asked earlier and Jimmy (Brandstatter) brought it up what is a Michigan Man, I've heard that a lot, I'm not from Michigan, how do I become a Michigan Man. Nobody would give me the definition, other than hey keep working hard, be passionate, give everything to the cause, which is having the best football program in America, represent you right on and off the field, be a good guy, have good guys around you and you believe in the university's ideals and you could be a Michigan Man. I think I'm a Michigan Man." Link...

Skip Holtz ‘ recruiting plan: "It's going to start in the Tampa area and try to build a fence around the 100 schools in that area," he said. "But we're going to recruit the state. That's going to be the main place we're going to recruit. We're all going to have an area in the Hillsborough County and surrounding counties, but then we'll have one in Orlando. We'll probably have two or three on the East Coast from Miami, Ft. Lauderdale, West Palm. We'll have one in one Jacksonville, we'll have one in the Panhandle. We're going to get into every school in this state at least once a year."

Bob Gregory talks about leaving Cal for Boise State: "Well, you know, I think it all comes down to what's important to ya at certain times of your life. And I loved the University of California. We loved California and the Bay Area. It just grew a little bit increasingly hard to have time with my young family. We were willing to maybe give all the title stuff up, so to speak, to come back here so I had more of a chance to raise my boys. So, there are thing in life that are very important, and you've got to make sure you put things in perspective. My wife and I are fired up to be back here."

"I would not have gone anywhere in America. A couple big reasons: Chris Peterson, the head football coach here. He and I go way back. I know what kind of guy he is. I know what kind of program he runs. I know he'a a family guy. I think you can win a lot of football games, as they've done here, and also have time for your family. And some times as football coaches we have a tendency to work, just to work. I think what they do here, is they work smart. And obviously, being in Boise, a great place to raise your family, and maybe have a little bit more room in your house, and being 10 minutes away from work - all those. You know it isn't one thing in particular, just a lot of things that add up to it."

Grantham sells 3-4 defensive to Georgia players: Keith Gray, the Bulldogs weight-staff assistant who played for Grantham at Virginia Tech, said this week, "He explained the concept of the 3-4 defense to the players in five minutes. They understood the concept immediately. It was very impressive."

"Make it hard for the other team to score," Grantham said. "We must be a fourth-quarter team. It is all about keeping them from scoring. It is all about finishing the game."

He speaks in the simplest of terms and will teach from that perspective.

"NFL players," he said the other day, "are not any smarter than college players. They're just older." Link...