2010 Coaches Quick Hits

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Wednesday May 12, 2010

Ed Orgeron talks about Lane Kiffin: "At Tennessee, he had to go out on the limb a little bit and challenge other the coaches and all that," said Orgeron, who spent three seasons as head coach at Mississippi from 2005-2007. "All he was doing was getting our name around. That's all that was."

"But damn right. I did the same thing [at Mississippi]. In the SEC, when you're the new guy, they want you to come in and just be timid. But you can't do that. You have go in there and bring it."

Quoting Southern Miss head coach Larry Fedora: ‘‘It (record) is not acceptable; not at all. ‘We have talked with the players about that and it is very important that they understand that."

‘‘It's not just a goal to win our conference. It's a matter of what we are going to do? What are we going to do if we lose our quarterback? What are we going to do if a running back goes down?"

"We were 7-6 this past year and the players knew we should have played for the conference championship."

"Now, we have to go out and make it happen.''

‘‘The last championship was in 2003. That's not acceptable. Southern Miss football is all about playing smart, playing fast and playing physical. I've seen it at times and that's when we played good football."

"To me, success is winning championships and being ready mentally. It's important that we understand that."

"Anything else will not be acceptable. I think the guys understand now.''

Quoting Nick Saban: "I think the big thing is that everybody assumes it's harder to repeat, which if you ask the Yankees they all said it was going to be harder, but I think what's harder is to focus on the process of the things that you need to do to be successful. Where does the hunger come? Where does the motivation come from? And that has to come from within the players to be as good as you can be. That doesn't mean you can win another championship."

"But the goal as a coach for me is that we get our players to play as well as we can as a unit and as a team so that we have the best chance to be successful."

An open letter from the Temple AD

Quoting new Mississippi AD Scott Stricklin: "I think we've got to start dreaming. Twenty-five years ago we had 30,000 seats in our football stadium. This year, we averaged almost 55,000 people, 25 years later. I think we need to start coming up with a vision right now of what 75,000 football seats might look like at Davis Wade Stadium. We're not going to get there overnight. It's going to be a process. But once you have a long term plan, then you can start phasing it in."

"We cannot be defined, as (MSU president) Dr. (Mark) Keenum said, by what our budget number is. We've got to be defined by something else. and whether that's our energy, our innovativeness, if that's a word, our ability to find what strengths we have, what's special about us and use that to recruit the very best student athletes, attract the very best coaches. You know what we're not going to be able to imitate some of the big boys in this league. We can't take their playbook and copy it and expect the same results. They've got different circumstances than we do. We've got some things that are unique to us. I think it's going to be important that we understand what our strengths are, play to our strengths without worrying about what someone else does. We may do some things unconventionally sometimes because it may give us an advantage."

San Diego State head coach Brady Hoke recalls his team in the spring of 2009: Hoke said they were, "woefully weak when we arrived here. It was (in size and strength) and work-ethic."

"(There was) a lack of belief and accountability."

Quoting former Miami and GA Tech OC Patrick Nix: "I'm waiting on God to open the next door. I'm not sure if it will be in coaching."

"Maybe the game has phased me out. Football isn't who I am. I don't have to spend every waking hour recruiting. It's a business now.

"I'm at a stage where I don't have to have coaching. I don't have to have the spotlight. I've been there, I've done that. I like being anonymous. I like being a husband to my wife and dad to my four kids."

"I believe the best job there is now is to coach and teach at middle school," Nix said. "That's where you can make the most impact. The kids are a blank canvas, everything's new, and you have a chance to be the man who molds a kid's life."